Vitamin B1, also known as thiamine, has a number of benefits. The body uses it as part of the metabolic process. As such most of the problems related to a vitamin B1 deficiency revolve around having a poor metabolic rate. A thiamine deficiency can also lead to problems related to your emotional and mental state. There are plenty of health benefits of vitamin B1/thiamine. Here are just some of the best.

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What Is the Recommended Daily Amount of Vitamin B1 – Thiamin ? (1)

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What Are the Sources of Vitamin B1 –  Thiamin ? (2)

Vitamin B1 or  Thiamin is found in nuts, oats, oranges, pork, eggs, seeds, legumes, peas, fish, bread, green peas,  pistachios, herring, spinach, squash, asparagus.

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What Are Common Vitamin B1 – Thiamine Deficiency Symptoms (3) (4)?

The worst kind of vitamin B1 deficiency is a disease known as Wernicke Encephalopathy. It is a neurological condition that can affect your memory primarily but also affects other parts of the mind. Vitamin B1 deficiency also causes emotional disturbance such as night terrors and panic attacks, and has physical effects such as weight loss or elevated heart rate, general weakness, fatigue, headache, irritability, abdominal discomfort, muscle weakness, colitis, confusion, nerve damage and nerve inflammation. These can be caused because one of the primary uses of Vitamin B1, and indeed every other B-Vitamin, is converting food into energy.

Health Benefits of Vitamin B1 – Thiamine

Metabolism
Thiamine is a necessary aid in the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which carries energy around the body in the mitochondria. Thiamine is also an important part of converting carbs into glucose, the energy source the body uses to keep the metabolism running properly. Thiamine is also used in the breakdown of proteins and fats. All in all everything about the metabolism, from the conversion of food into energy, to the production of red blood cells, depends on vitamin B1/thiamine.

Nerve Damage
One of the main things that the energy from carbohydrates is used for is keeping our brain and nervous system in good health. Thiamine especially is needed for enzyme reactions known as pyruvate dehydrogenase. These reactions oxidize the sugars that we eat and the energy is used to prevent our nerves from getting damaged. Nerve damage can lead to all kinds of problems including trouble moving, learning, and memory problems. Thiamine is also used in the development of myelin sheaths, which essentially shield your nerves from further damage and death.

Cardiovascular Health
Thiamine plays an important role in the production of acetylcholine. This neurotransmitter sends messages between the nerves and the muscles. Remember that one of the most important muscles in your body, one that relies on these messages, is the heart. The heart needs these messages to maintain proper function and these messages need energy. Thiamine has been shown to help reduce the risks of heart disease by ensuring messages are passed to and from the heart to maintain heart function and also treat heart failure.

Immunity
Thiamine is used to keep the muscles that line the digestive tract in good condition. This also happens to be where our immune system is actually found in the body. Keeping your digestive system healthy helps in the absorption of thiamine along with the other important nutrients in food. These nutrients are then used to strengthen the immune system to keep you healthy. Thiamine can also help with this by stimulating the production and release of hydrochloric acid, which the body uses to digest food and absorb as many nutrients as possible from it.

Learning
Thiamine is an important vitamin that can help increase focus, energy, and ward away stress. It can also help prevent memory loss. As such not having enough thiamine can lead to problems with learning information and then retaining it in the brain. One study showed that when patients took thiamine they increased their reaction times and felt clear-headed when they were presented with tests.

Sources
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16550223
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22116701
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23910704
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9122365

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Vitamin B1, also known as thiamine, has a number of benefits. The body uses it as part of the metabolic process. As such most of the problems related to a vitamin B1 deficiency revolve around having a poor metabolic rate. A thiamine deficiency can also lead to problems related...