High blood sugar levels are caused when there is too much sugar for the body to handle and it can lead to diabetes. A study from 2012 showed that 12-14% of all US adults had Type-2 Diabetes while another 37% were classified as “Pre-diabetic”. Overall this means that half of all adults in the US are either diabetic or pre-diabetic.

Here are four easy ways to keep your blood sugar levels down naturally.

How to Lower your Blood Sugar Levels Natural_dailyhealthyfoodtips

Control Your Carbs
Your body turns the carbs you eat into sugar (particularly glucose) and then the insulin in your body takes this sugar to your cells. Eating too many carbs means that your insulin doesn’t function properly and you have too much blood glucose. The good news is that you can solve this problem.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that you count your carbs or use a food exchange system to monitor and control carb intake. Studies have shown that this can help you plan meals properly to further control blood sugar levels.

Studies have also shown that eating a low-carb diet reduces blood sugar level spikes and reduces overall blood sugar levels. It also helps you to control your blood sugar in the long-term.

To sum it up; carbs are broken down into glucose, which raises your blood sugar levels. So reducing your carb intake reduces blood sugar levels.

Eat More Fiber
Fiber slows down the digestion of carbs and the absorption of sugar. So it stops blood sugar levels from rising too quickly. Different kinds of fiber can have different effects.

Fiber comes in two different kinds; insoluble and soluble. While both kinds are important, soluble fiber is particularly useful for lowering blood sugar levels.

Eating a high-fiber diet also helps control type-1 diabetes by improving your control over blood sugar levels and reducing the chances of a blood sugar crash.

Foods that are rich in fiber include vegetables, fruits, legumes, and whole grains. It’s recommended that women eat 25 grams of fiber a day while men eat 38 grams. This works out at around 14 grams per 1,000 calories.

To sum it up; eating lots of fiber controls blood sugar levels and soluble dietary fiber is the best kind of fiber for the job.

Eat Foods Rich in Chromium and Magnesium
Having high blood sugar levels and diabetes has also been linked to having micronutrient deficiencies.

Having a chromium and magnesium deficiency proved particularly problematic. Chromium is necessary for metabolising carbs and fat. As such it also plays a role in managing blood sugar levels. Having a lack of chromium can also increase your risks of developing a carb intolerance.

Studies on diabetes patients showed that chromium could help with long-term blood sugar control. Magnesium has also been proven to affect blood sugar levels, with a deficiency in magnesium linked to the risk of developing diabetes. One study showed that the people with the highest levels of magnisum had a 47% lower chance of developing diabetes.

Eat Foods with a Low Glycemic Index
The glycemic index was put together to assess how blood sugar levels respond to foods containing carbs. The amount and type of carb plays a role in how the food affects your blood sugar levels.

Eating foods with a low glycemic index reduces the long-term blood sugar levels of type-1 and type-2 diabetes sufferers. While the glycemic index is important you shouldn’t neglect the amount of the carbs eaten either.

Foods with low glycemic index include seafood, meat, eggs, oats, barley, beans, lentils, legumes, sweet potatoes, corn, yams, fruits and non-starchy vegetables.

To sum it up; you need to eat foods with a low glycemic index while reducing your overall carb intake.

 

 

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High blood sugar levels are caused when there is too much sugar for the body to handle and it can lead to diabetes. A study from 2012 showed that 12-14% of all US adults had Type-2 Diabetes while another 37% were classified as “Pre-diabetic”. Overall this means that half...